WAYK Cree: Session 2

For our second WAYK: Cree session, which took place on August 26, 2014, our original five players (Dereck Robertson, Lorna Whitford, Diana Emes, Rob Jarvis, and Caylie Gnyra) showed up again, which made it easy to jump right in to where we left off.

We started with a TQ: no-pressure refresher of what we had learned last week, and we zipped right through it. Next, we did a quick round of basic introductions (“tân’si.” “namôya nân’taw, kîya mâka?” “peyakwan.”) to fill in the one member of our group who wasn’t familiar with the greetings people were using. After that, we moved on to our second ride, which focused on “mine” vs. “yours.”

I had originally set up the ride (condensed version shown below) to include the nouns we had used last time (“salt” and “mirror”), but decided to use “cell phone” instead because I thought it might have higher mileage–phones are something we’re constantly talking or thinking about! We then spent the hour learning how to ask each other, and answer, whether the phones on the table were “mine” or “yours.” This ride will allow learners to plug in the “my”/”your” rules they’ve learned into any inanimate object they come across from now on! We introduced three new TQ: Craigslists: (1) nîya/kîya/kiyanaw, (2) nîya/ni-, and (3) kîya/ki-. Cree is tough because it’s a polysynthetic language, so we’ve got to teach little bits of words that aren’t actually words on their own. That’s tough for native English speakers to wrap their minds around! Hopefully we’ll be able to figure out some strategies to convey to each other when a new thing we’re learning is not a word on its own, but just part of a word.

I forgot to lead plus/deltas again. I think I may rethink introducing “cell phone” for this round because it has 5 or 6 syllables (depending on how you pronounce it), which makes it quite tricky for early learners.

Mine and yours

kîkwâyôma?

sewepîcikanis ôma.

kisewepîcikanis ôma?

eha, nisewepîcikanis ôma.

nisewepîcikanis ôma?

namôya, namôya ôma kisewepîcikanis, nisewepîcikanis ôma.